Obituaries

Fern Melton
B: 1933-12-06
D: 2018-10-10
View Details
Melton, Fern
Robert Ems
B: 1947-07-16
D: 2018-09-29
View Details
Ems, Robert
Michael Smith
B: 1944-11-23
D: 2018-09-27
View Details
Smith, Michael
Henry Souza
B: 1929-02-06
D: 2018-09-24
View Details
Souza, Henry
Mary Hall
B: 1946-01-19
D: 2018-09-22
View Details
Hall, Mary
Elizabeth Fryman
B: 1934-08-21
D: 2018-09-17
View Details
Fryman, Elizabeth
Amy Neely
B: 1972-12-13
D: 2018-09-13
View Details
Neely, Amy
James Franklin
B: 1930-09-09
D: 2018-09-11
View Details
Franklin, James
James Lee
B: 1960-10-07
D: 2018-09-03
View Details
Lee, James
Doris McGee
B: 1933-02-08
D: 2018-08-31
View Details
McGee, Doris
Winnie Smith
B: 1926-01-02
D: 2018-08-31
View Details
Smith, Winnie
Yuridtza Martinez Trejo
B: 2018-08-27
D: 2018-08-31
View Details
Martinez Trejo, Yuridtza
Ethel Crutchfield
D: 2018-08-20
View Details
Crutchfield, Ethel
Anita Chitwood
B: 1951-10-30
D: 2018-08-14
View Details
Chitwood, Anita
Vivian Bowling
B: 1932-07-25
D: 2018-08-10
View Details
Bowling, Vivian
Cathryn Cull
B: 1930-01-10
D: 2018-08-05
View Details
Cull, Cathryn
Mary Ice
B: 1933-10-04
D: 2018-07-30
View Details
Ice, Mary
Joyce Requet
B: 1941-12-07
D: 2018-07-30
View Details
Requet, Joyce
Norma Bear
B: 1941-03-27
D: 2018-07-21
View Details
Bear, Norma
Robert Youngblood
B: 1946-09-28
D: 2018-07-20
View Details
Youngblood, Robert
Daniel Hoffman
B: 1969-09-05
D: 2018-07-18
View Details
Hoffman, Daniel

Search

Use the form above to find your loved one. You can search using the name of your loved one, or any family name for current or past services entrusted to our firm.

Click here to view all obituaries
Search Obituaries
423 West Main Street
Madison, IN 47250
Phone: 812-265-4021
Fax: 8122652133

Immediate Need

If you have immediate need of our services, we're available for you 24 hours a day.

Pre-Arrangement

A gift to your family, sparing them hard decisions at an emotional time.

Order Flowers

Offer a gift of comfort and beauty to a family suffering from loss.

Lytle Pet Services

Connect to our Pet Services here.

Funeral Etiquette

The accepted customs of dress and behavior in a funeral have changed over time, but courtesy never goes out of style. Here’s what we’d like you to know about funeral etiquette.

Making the Most of a Difficult Time

It’s important to know what religious, ethnic or personal considerations you need to take into account. And it’s also important to be respectful of the emotions of close family members.

Here are a few things expected of you:

- Offer an expression of sympathy.
Sometimes we are at a loss for words when encountering something as final as death. Simply saying "I'm sorry for your loss" is usually enough. Be respectful and listen attentively when spoken to, and offer your own words of condolence.

- Find out the dress code.
These days almost anything goes, but only when you know it's the right thing. In fact, sometimes the deceased has specified the dress code; 'no black' is a common request. If you can't learn the wishes of the family, then dress conservatively, and avoid bright colors.

- Give a gift.
It doesn't matter if it is flowers, a donation to a charity or a commitment of service to the family at a later date; as always, "it's the thought that counts." Always make sure to provide the family with a signed card, so they know what gift was given, and by whom.

- Sign the register book.
Include not only your name, but your relationship to the deceased: co-worker, gym buddy, or casual acquaintance from the golf club. This helps family place who you are in future.

- Keep in touch.
It's sometimes awkward for you to do so, but for most people the grieving doesn't end with a funeral.

But, What Shouldn't You Do?

- Don't feel that you have to stay.
If you make a visit during calling hours there's no reason your stay has to be a lengthy one.

- Don't be afraid to laugh.
Remembering their loved one fondly can mean sharing a funny story or two. Just be mindful of the time and place; if others are sharing, then you may do so too. There is simply no good reason you shouldn't talk about the deceased in a happy, positive tone.

- Don't feel you have to view the deceased if there is an open casket.
Act according to what is comfortable to you.

- Don't allow your children to be a disturbance.
If you feel they might be, then leave them with a sitter. But, if the deceased meant something to them, it's a good idea to invite them to share in the experience.

- Don't leave your cell phone on.
Switch it off before entering the funeral home, or better yet, leave it in the car. All too often, we see people checking their cell phones for messages during the services.

- Don't neglect to step into the receiving line.
Simply say how sorry you are for their loss, offer up your own name and how you knew the deceased.

- Don't be too hard on yourself if you make a mistake.
Everyone does, and you can be sure that an apology may be all that's needed to mend and soothe.

When it's all over, always remember to continue to offer support and love to the bereaved. The next few months are a time when grieving friends and relatives could need you most. Let them know that your support did not end with the funeral.

We are Here to Help

Perhaps you've got special concerns about an upcoming funeral or memorial service? We're here to provide the answers you're looking for. Call us at (812) 265-4021

365 Days of Healing

Grieving doesn't always end with the funeral: subscribe to our free daily grief support email program, designed to help you a little bit every day, by filling out the form below.

52 Weeks of Support

It's hard to know what to say when someone experiences loss. Our free weekly newsletter provides insights, quotes and messages on how to help during the first year.